Thursday, November 10, 2016

1973 Mercury Cougar XR7

Originally designed as an upscale version of Ford’s Mustang, the Mercury Cougar would take an entirely different direction for the 1974 model year, growing in size and plushness to become a personal luxury coupe instead of a pony car. That makes this 1973 Mercury Cougar XR7, for sale on Hemmings.com, the last of the “classic Cougars,” the final model year to share a platform with the Ford Mustang, and the last version to focus on performance over comfort. Described as a restored driver-quality car, this cat comes powered by a 351 Cleveland V-8 topped by a two-barrel carburetor, which was rated at 168 SAE net horsepower. As an XR7 version, it adds chrome rocker panels, unique wheel covers, a vinyl roof, and additional gauges, and this example was even ordered new with the power sunroof and Whisper-Aire air conditioning. Best of all, you probably won’t see another one at every Saturday morning cruise-in. From the seller’s description:
You are viewing a 1973 Mercury Cougar XR-7 that has undergone a loving, FRAME-ON restoration with under 75,000 ORIGINAL MILES (at time of ad).
This car was billed as the “Gentlemen’s Muscle Car” or a “Muscle Car in a Sports Jacket” because it was more luxurious and refined than its’ Mustang stable mate.
It comes equipped with the 351 Cleveland 2bbl, arguably the best V8 ever produced by the Ford Motor Company, mated to the C-6 Automatic Transmission.
It has power steering, power power brakes, and the rare, power sunroof option. Only 840 power sunroofs were ordered that year. How many are left???
The A/C and original AM/FM radio are functional.
The floor console houses the shifter and a WORKING analog clock.
This car has never been hit as evidenced by the arrow-straight body lines.
Also included are the owner’s manual, owner card, and retail delivery card – all original as well as the Marti report.
Don’t let this oportunity to own a piece of American muscle car history slip away. Although I’ve tried to be complete in my description, I will answer any and all questions to the best of my ability.
1973 Mercury Cougar XR7 1973 Mercury Cougar XR7 1973 Mercury Cougar XR7 1973 Mercury Cougar XR7


Source: blog.hemmings.com

1955 Mercury Montclair



Click Here to read all about this Montclair and to view other photos.

Source: hemmings.com

1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia

It isn’t likely that the first owner of this 1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia, for sale on Hemmings.com, purchased his car for investment purposes, intent on preserving it for future generations. Life, as the saying goes, is what happens while we’re busy making other plans, and, four decades after this car rolled off the assembly line, it reportedly shows just 7,602 miles on the odometer. Said to be all-original, down to the paint and even the tires, this Monarch might be the finest remaining example of the breed left on the planet, yet its asking price probably wouldn’t buy you a new Ford Focus. Need more incentive? The two-door Monarchs were the least common variant, with less than 15,000 built for 1976, and this one even sports the optional 302 V-8, rated at 134 horsepower and 242 pound-feet of torque. From the seller’s description:
1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia, A true mid 70’s museum piece. Documented 7,600 actual miles. Original, right down to the tires and complete exhaust system. V8, PS/PDB/AC, Buckets/Automatic w/console, AM/FM stereo and the list goes on. Title history, build sheets, original bill of sale, Marti report, etc. Would make a great addition to any collection!
1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia 1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia 1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia 1976 Mercury Monarch Ghia

1964 Mercury Comet



Click Here to read all about this Mercury Comet as well as to view other pictures.

Source: hemmings.com

Sunday, October 2, 2016

1947 Mercury Monarch Sedan


061816 Barn Finds - 1947 Mercury Monarch - 1
This is a 1947 Mercury Monarch, wait, 1947 Mercury Monarch? Yes, a Canadian market car. It’s in Pembina, North Dakota; near the Canadian border, so it’s starting to make sense. It’s listed on eBay with a Buy It Now price of $3,500 or make an offer, eh. (sorry, that’s the last one of those, I promise)


061816 Barn Finds - 1947 Mercury Monarch - 2
The Monarch was a product of Ford of Canada from 1946 to 1957 and then again from 1959 to 1961. It’s not the Mercury Monarch from the mid-1970s to 1980 that we all know and love. I say, that we all know and love.. (crickets) Here’s a fairly interesting piece of trivia, especially for you Ford fans: the Monarch was dropped after the 1957 model year because of the introduction of the Edsel. Then, because of the poor reception that the Edsel got the Monarch was brought back again in 1959. I can’t get over how nice and straight this car looks. As you probably already know, the four-door sedan was the most popular body style for the Monarch in 1947.

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This particular car looks as solid and straight as any ice road in Canada. The seller says that this “true barn find” is 99% complete, but they mention that the engine isn’t currently running. There aren’t any photos of the engine, unfortunately, but this car should have had a 239 V8 with around 97 hp compared to the US version that had around 100 hp. These cars would have had a 3-speed manual with a column shifter.

061816 Barn Finds - 1947 Mercury Monarch - 4image: http://barnfinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/061816-Barn-Finds-1947-Mercury-Monarch-4-630x473.jpg

Is this a great car, or what?! Look at the bottoms of the doors, they look like new. This is a great car!

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Even the interior looks good, although you can see that a few things will have to be fixed, mostly the “soft goods”; seats, door panels, kick panels, etc. The steering wheel could use a little help so you don’t pinch your fingers every time you turn a corner. And, there’s the all-important heater; pretty handy in Canada, or North Dakota, or almost anywhere at some point during the year. I think this would be a great car to get running and drive it as it looks here. You could do a full restoration for sure, this one is solid enough, at least from looking at the photos, but the cost would soon get you in over your head. I can’t imagine that there is anything mechanical on this car that couldn’t be fixed and a person could just enjoy a super interesting, rare (at least in the US) car. What would you do, would you restore this one or just get it working and drive it as it looks now?

Source: barnfinds.com

Still In The Barn, Dirty Old 1949 Mercury

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This find discovered by our own Josh is for those of you that say we’ve gotten soft–that we don’t feature enough “dirty old cars in barns.” It’s located in a barn in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is up for sale here on eBay, where the buy it now is $2,900 but the seller is “open to reasonable offers”. And it’s pretty dirty and old!

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As is common with “real” barn finds like this, we don’t have good pictures or know much about the vehicle either. I’m guessing someone started to create a custom car at some point and got as far as removing most of the trim and lights. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) they stopped there. The seller apparently knows very little about the car.

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It looks like at least 1/2 the windshield is gone, and there’s really no telling about side windows as well. The rear window looks okay but we don’t know if there are cracks under all that dirt. It’s also really hard to tell about body condition as well, especially floors and rockers. I would want to see some more pictures before making any kind of a bid.

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This picture, however, tells us a lot–and it’s not great. For one thing, you can see a rusty rocker panel. Oh, and that’s a transmission sitting in the driver’s seat. By the way (and the seller confirms this) there’s no dash. No door latches or handles either. And it’s a sedan. Oh, and I forgot to mention there’s no title. So–these are pretty common things when you find a real barn find. However–perhaps you have a long lost love of a particular 1949 Mercury. Maybe it was dark blue. Maybe, just maybe, you’re willing to disassemble the frozen Mercury flathead V8 that’s under the hood and coax it in
to life again. Perhaps you just have a thing about rescuing barn finds? Is this your long-lost Mercury?

Source: barnfinds.com

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Ford Edsel's

1959 Edsel Ranger Two-door Hardtop

Source: Internet